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Think Better

8 things make me happy

  1. First thing first. Travelling. Didn’t we all miss travelling? The excitement you have on the day of travel. The moment you leave your flat to go to the airport. The excitement when you hear “Prepare for take-off” from the captain. I know it’s a very cliche but travelling really broaden our horizons and I’m looking forward to the moving out of the Truman Show & Groundhog day kind of routine I’m having during last year. 
  2. Listening to music. I like all kind of genres. I listened to electronic music when I’m working or writing. It helps me to be in the flow. But at the same time, I have several tattoos of Beatles’ lyrics too. I think my favourite genre is Rock. Anyhow different genres at different times during the day help me to navigate this crazy world. I can’t imagine a world without it for me. 
  3. Reading. It’s kind of time travel for me. Helps me to absorb an extensive topic in a distilled way. Jumping in an author’s world so quickly is like teleportation. 
  4. Walking. Helps me to let it out. To sink all in. Think. Rethink. Unlearn and learn again. I find my best ideas when walking most of the time.
  5. Movies. Helps me to find myself in a parallel universe for a couple of hours. I realised how much movies can provide different perspectives to me about the world we live in.
  6. Learning. That’s how I feel alive. If I don’t learn new things I think I feel I’m not living a meaningful life. If I find an interesting topic, a good problem to solve, I’m like Sherlock Holmes. Research, explore, dig deep on that until I realise how little I know about the world and then I go even deeper.
  7. Writing because it gets me thinking. As James Clear says, writing is an antidote to confusion. It helps me to think, and think clearly in particular. 
  8. Building. Because if you start building then it means you are a person in the arena. That means you’re vulnerable. You start realising how little you know about the things you thought you know. 

Like Roosevelt says: 
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.


Be the person in the arena and be grateful. 

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